Member Spotlight: Meet Tracy Templin, National Louis University

Tracy Templin Tracy Templin, Director of Strategy and Operations at National Louis University

1. What is your current role/title?
I serve as the Executive Director of Strategy and Operations within the Undergraduate College at National Louis University.


2. Where did you earn your degrees and what did you study?
I have earned a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) from Johns Hopkins University and a Master of Social Work (MSW) from Washington University in St. Louis. I hold a B.A. in English and Sociology from DePaul University.


3. How did your college/university support your success in earning your degrees?

During my freshman year at DePaul University, while I received Pell and state aid and took out loans to help with the cost of attendance, I still struggled with the cost of a private university education and living expenses. The full weight of this financial burden wasn't realized until I began to receive my tuition bills as they mounted up over fall and winter terms. By spring term of my first year, I had decided to leave and transfer to a public university the next fall, offering a more affordable option. At the end of the term, I made an appointment with my professor/faculty advisor in the English department, to inform her I was transferring due to financial constraints. Several weeks later, after the term had ended, I received a notice from DePaul that I had been awarded a grant from the institution that provided additional funding for tuition expenses. Unbeknownst to me, my professor had advocated on my behalf for this grant, which is the reason that I ended up persisting and was able to graduate from DePaul. This experience continues to motivate me each day to be an advocate for students facing similar financial challenges in affording a college education.

4. What excites you about equity work at your institution?
There are so many things! When I first came to NLU, I was drawn to the Undergraduate College's mission is to drive equity in bachelor's degree attainment. This means that the equity work is not just another initiative, but it is central to how we operate and serve students. As we have grown in students, faculty, and staff, I am excited each day to collaborate with, be challenged by, and learn from colleagues who are committed to this work and their own personal journey. While I am excited by how much our College has accomplished and the individual success stories of our students, I am also motivated by our commitment to continuous improvement and challenging the policies, processes, and mindsets that contribute to inequity as we work towards justice on behalf of our students.


5. In your role, how do you impact equitable outcomes for your students?

As a white woman in a leadership role at an institution that is serving predominately Latinx and Black students, I strive to continue my own learning and challenge my own biases as I engage in everyday practices. Through my role, I have had the opportunity to lead and participate on the Core Team that developed our Institution's Equity Plan, incorporating student, staff, and faulty voice as we developed the plan. Another area I am passionate about in my role is developing the capacity and culture in the College to use data through an equity-minded approach to drive action. Equity-minded data use by leadership, faculty, and staff has resulted in the examination of policies, curriculum and instructional practices that may be contributing to disparate outcomes and influenced the implementation of new or revised practices to increase equity across our college.

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Member Spotlight: Meet Marisol Velázquez, Morton College

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1. What is your current role/title?

I have the pleasure of serving as the Dean of Student Services at Morton College. Recently, celebrated my 13th year anniversary with the college.

2. Where did you earn your degrees and what did you study?

Currently, I'm pursuing a Doctorate in Education from DePaul University, earned a Master's degree in Urban Planning and Policy and hold a B.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences from the University of Illinois at Chicago.


3. How did your college/university support your success in earning your degrees?

Morton College has supported me in more ways than one through my educational journey. I am eternally grateful for the ongoing support that the college has provided. Morton College has been extremely supportive and encouraging by offering not only systems of support, mentorship but also financial assistance through our tuition reimbursement. My colleagues are my biggest supporters and I'm grateful for their guidance and positive outlook. Our President, Dr. Stan Fields is who encouraged me to begin pursing my doctorate. Without his encouragement and mentorship, I would not be in the final phase of my doctorate.

4. What excites you about equity work at your institution?

Working for a Hispanic Serving Institution where our student body is composed of a large majority of minoritized students, we have a responsibility to institutionalize equity minded practices. I am excited about our equity work because we are not working as individuals but as an institution to remove existing disparities. We have an opportunity to create real impact in our student's lives and the lives of their families. It's truly exciting to experience that together we are challenging a system that for long has disadvantaged our students and community. We are challenging more than the "this is how it was done before" mentality and breaking down barriers that ensure our students graduate and persist. Lastly, witnessing others wanting to be part of equity initiatives gives me confidence that change is inevitable.

5. In your role, how do you impact equitable outcomes for your students?

As a first-generation college student, who worked multiple jobs to afford college, raised by single mother of four, I have lived the same struggles many of our students are currently facing. One of the ways that my role impacts equitable outcomes is by having a seat at the table and sharing my lens with the decision makers to ensure our students' needs are recognized and addressed. Being in my position allows me to develop, introduce and execute equity initiatives such as ILEA. Being part of the ILEA Cohort expands on the institution's commitment to racial equity. The college recognizes the transformation that needs to take place in order to be equity leaders in removing the inequitable conditions ingrained in the fabric of our education system. Our equity plan is our pledge to hold our self and the institution accountable to closing equity gaps.

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ILEA Member Spotlight: Meet Dr. Mary Daniels, Chicago State University

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1. What is your current role/title?

I serve as Associate Provost for Academic Innovation and Strategic Initiatives.

2. Where did you earn your degrees and what did you study?

BA (Political Science), Reed College 

AM (Political Science), University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 

PhD (Political Science), University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

3. How did your college/university support your success in earning your degrees?

I benefited enormously from faculty mentorship at my college, which was a very academically rigorous environment which attracted many students from highly prepared, privileged backgrounds. For a first-generation student who experienced doubts about my own capabilities and belonging on such a campus, it was so valuable to have a faculty mentor who provided invaluable feedback on everything from my senior thesis to guidance about graduate school, and what a career in academia would involve. Even one person to connect with can make such an important difference—something I've tried to remind myself throughout my own career. At my graduate institution, close friendships and a support network of peers in the program provided camaraderie and help in so many ways—tackling the curriculum, finding an area of specialization, completing the dissertation, and navigating the job market after graduate school. The department provided many valuable opportunities to learn the profession and work with each other through research and teaching fellowships. There was ample support for conference travel and research, which extended to a fellowship year at Oxford University while completing my dissertation.

4. What excites you about equity work at your institution?

More than anything, the opportunity to contribute to the work of creating access to higher education regardless of race, income, or family background, particularly at a time when Black student enrollment has dropped by 29% in Illinois. As Illinois' only four-year Predominantly Black Institution as designated by the U.S. Department of Education, Chicago State University is laser focused on closing equity gaps. As a part of our 2020 - 2025 Strategic Plan, Chicago State University is committed to building student support scaffolding that increases rates of persistence and reduces the time to degree completion. This work is in motion with the launch this summer of Cougar Commitment, a holistic, data-driven set of strategies to improve student success. A prong of Cougar Commitment is Rise Academy, which gives freshmen a year-long full-tuition scholarship, a summer bridge course, and intensive academic advising. Exciting innovations like this, which bring together faculty, administrators, students, donors and the community, help me to believe that together we will make a difference in creating a society that values education and works to reduce the barriers to entry for everyone.

5. In your role, how do you impact equitable outcomes for your students?

Chicago State University has a comprehensive approach to student success, from developing college-ready high school students to preparing our scholars to succeed in their careers. Further, the University recognizes that investments in our community facilitate student success. As Associate Provost for Academic Innovation and Strategic Initiatives, I play a leadership role in projects across this spectrum, and am privileged to collaborate on projects with our college deans and department chairs, members of President Scott's team, and external allies in this work like the Partnership for College Completion. Recent efforts include collaborating across the university to create our ILEA Equity Plan, where we discovered the relative success of transfer students in on-time degree completion compared to first-time full-time freshmen. We are digging into the reasons for that and simultaneously developing assessment tools to measure the impact of a series of integrated, holistic student support programs that have been put into place. CSU is committed to restructuring higher education to increase access for all learners in our undergraduate and graduate degree programs, through certificate and stackable credential programs, and by removing barriers to entry and completion, wherever they might be.

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2020 ILEA Virtual Fall Summit Recap

The fourth ILEA Summit, held October 21-23, 2020, was our first-ever virtual summit, and was unequivocally a success! Over 350 faculty, staff, administrators from your institutions attended the summit, themed Engaging Faculty Champions in Equity Work. The summit kicked-off with a video welcome from Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago, followed by a keynote address, "Saying Equity Will Not Beget Racial Equity" from Dr. Estela Bensimon, Director of the Center for Urban Education & Professor of USC Rossier School of Education, Center for Urban Education, University of Southern California. Dr. Bensimon also led a session for ILEA presidents and conducted the faculty workshop, "The Syllabus As an Instrument for Racial Equity."Other workshops focused on achieving equitable student outcomes, diversifying approaches for equity and inclusion and faculty hiring through an equity lens and were conducted by Dr. Davis Jenkins, Research Scholar Community College Research Center, Teacher's College, Columbia University, Dr. Noelle Arnold, Associate Dean for Equity, Diversity Inclusion and Global Engagement (EDGE) College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Dr. Kimberly McRae, Faculty Counselor and Instructor, Seattle Central College and Dr. Vik Bahl, Faculty, Green River College.

The Summit included our first Illinois Legislative Panel session focused on the higher education agenda in Illinois. Panel participants included: Dr. Vernese Edghill-Walden, Chief Diversity Officer, Northern Illinois University, Dr. Escortina Ervin, Executive Director of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Compliance, Joliet Junior College and Dr. Mary Daniels, Associate Provost, Innovation and Strategic Initiatives, Chicago State University, Representative Chris Welch, State Representative, 7th District of Illinois, Representative Nick Smith, State Representative, 34th District of Illinois and Senator Celina Villanueva, State Senator, 11th District of Illinois.

Dr. Lisa Freeman, President of Northern Illinois University and David Sanders, President of Malcolm X College served as panelists on our first Presidential Reflections panel.They talked about leading equity initiatives on their campus.We also heard from representatives from ILEA schools in "Equity Speaks" sessions, where they discussed the equity planning process on their campuses as well as specific strategies in their plans. Lisa Castillo Richmond, Managing Director, PCC delivered the State of ILEA address on the final day of the summit where she discussed some of the additional equity challenges brought on by COVID-19 and highlighted strategies underway at ILEA institutions to ensure equity.

Summit by the Numbers:

  • Total Number of Attendees: 350+
  • Total Number of Faculty: 134
  • Highest Overall Participation (2-yr): College of DuPage
  • Highest Overall Participation (4-yr): Northern Illinois University
  • Most Faculty Registrations: Harper College
  • Top WHOVA Engagers:
    Dr. Scott Friedman, Moraine Valley Community College
    o Lorri Scott, College of Lake County
    o Gayle Miller, College of Lake County
  • Summit Evaluation, Quality of the Summit:
    47.06% rated it Excellent
    o 47.06% rated it Very Good


Many presentations and supporting materials from the summit can be found in the WHOVA app and will also be available on the ILEA portal in early 2021. For additional information, contact your Equity Program Manager.

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ILEA Member Spotlight: Meet Brandon Nichols, Ed.D, Olive–Harvey College

1. What is your current role/title?

I currently serve as Vice President, Academic Affairs.

2. Where did you earn your degrees and what did you study?

Sociology – BS, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign,

Clinical Psychology – MA, Argosy University (American School of Professional Psychology) – Washington, DC,

Counseling Psychology – Ed.D, Argosy University (American School of Professional Psychology) – Washington, DC

3. How did your college/university support your success in earning your degrees?

Mentorship and socialization opportunities were essential to my development, growth, success. For minoritized students, mentoring is often considered a crucial resource to foster support systems of role models and to garner the academic success. At my undergraduate and graduate institutions, mentor groups, extended new student orientation for students of color, social organizations, and guidance counseling for undeclared majors provided structure and knowledge gaps in navigating a path for successful completion.

4. What excites you about equity work at your institution?

It is gratifying to empower students in reaching their full potential by removing barriers that have historically impacted minoritized students. At Olive-Harvey College, we use a high-touch approach to engage every student to meet their needs to ensure success and completion for all students seeking a credential.

5. In your role, how do you impact equitable outcomes for your students?

As Vice President of Olive-Harvey College, I am grounded in a person-centered and mission-driven approach, through a civic and equity lens. I am currently a member of the College's Illinois Equity Attainment Committee and supporter of the College's Equity Plan. The Plan details specific strategies to support academic success, social integration, and student completion. To support student completion efforts through equity, the College has developed tactics to refine classroom instruction, measuring learning, co-curricular learning, and civic. In my role, I am in support equity through the following​:

  • Faculty development of culturally responsive pedagogy and teaching

  • Multiple measures of learning assessments and tests to align with student learning preferences through face-to-face and hybrid modes of instruction

  • Social integration and exploratory co-curricular opportunities through field and work-based learning experiences

  • Civic engagement through public service events and social justice support (i.e. voter registration, trash clean-up, and community townhalls)


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ILEA Member Spotlight: Meet Brandon Nichols, Ed.D, Olive–Harvey College

1. What is your current role/title?

I currently serve as Vice President, Academic Affairs.

2. Where did you earn your degrees and what did you study?

Sociology – BS, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign,

Clinical Psychology – MA, Argosy University (American School of Professional Psychology) – Washington, DC,

Counseling Psychology – Ed.D, Argosy University (American School of Professional Psychology) – Washington, DC

3. How did your college/university support your success in earning your degrees?

Mentorship and socialization opportunities were essential to my development, growth, success. For minoritized students, mentoring is often considered a crucial resource to foster support systems of role models and to garner the academic success. At my undergraduate and graduate institutions, mentor groups, extended new student orientation for students of color, social organizations, and guidance counseling for undeclared majors provided structure and knowledge gaps in navigating a path for successful completion.

4. What excites you about equity work at your institution?

It is gratifying to empower students in reaching their full potential by removing barriers that have historically impacted minoritized students. At Olive-Harvey College, we use a high-touch approach to engage every student to meet their needs to ensure success and completion for all students seeking a credential.

5. In your role, how do you impact equitable outcomes for your students?

As Vice President of Olive-Harvey College, I am grounded in a person-centered and mission-driven approach, through a civic and equity lens. I am currently a member of the College's Illinois Equity Attainment Committee and supporter of the College's Equity Plan. The Plan details specific strategies to support academic success, social integration, and student completion. To support student completion efforts through equity, the College has developed tactics to refine classroom instruction, measuring learning, co-curricular learning, and civic. In my role, I am in support equity through the following​:

  • Faculty development of culturally responsive pedagogy and teaching

  • Multiple measures of learning assessments and tests to align with student learning preferences through face-to-face and hybrid modes of instruction

  • Social integration and exploratory co-curricular opportunities through field and work-based learning experiences

  • Civic engagement through public service events and social justice support (i.e. voter registration, trash clean-up, and community townhalls)


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Three ILEA Schools Make Aspen’s Top 150 List

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CHICAGO, November 20, 2019 — The Partnership for College Completion congratulates ILEA members Elgin Community College, Joliet Junior College, and Moraine Valley Community College for their selection as eligible institutions to compete for the 2021 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. The $1 million prize awarded every two years by the highly-regarded Aspen Institute recognizes high achievement and performance among community colleges in the United States. With a focus on student success, the Prize highlights institutions with outstanding achievements in four areas: student learning, certificate and degree completion, employment and earnings, and high-levels of access and success for students of color and low-income students.

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Three ILEA Schools Make Aspen’s Top 150 List

Three ILEA Schools Make Aspen’s Top 150 List

CHICAGO, November 20, 2019 — The Partnership for College Completion congratulates ILEA members Elgin Community College, Joliet Junior College, and Moraine Valley Community College for their selection as eligible institutions to compete for the 2021 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. The $1 million prize awarded every two years by the highly-regarded Aspen Institute recognizes high achievement and performance among community colleges in the United States. With a focus on student success, the Prize highlights institutions with outstanding achievements in four areas: student learning, certificate and degree completion, employment and earnings, and high-levels of access and success for students of color and low-income students.

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Member Spotlight: Meet Eunice Heredia, National Louis University

Eunice

1. What is your current role/title?
I have been working with City Colleges of Chicago for six years. My current role is Assistant Director of Financial Aid. Before working at City Colleges of Chicago, I worked with the Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC). I have a total of eight years working with state and federal aid. Where did you earn your degree(s)? Types of degree(s) and field(s) of study? I received my Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Lake Forest College, and I am working towards obtaining my Master's degree in Public Policy from DePaul University and will be graduating before the end of the year.


2. Where did you earn your degrees and what did you study?
I received my Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Lake Forest College, and I am working towards obtaining my Master's degree in Public Policy from DePaul University and will be graduating before the end of the year.


3. How did your college/university support your success in earning your degrees?

My experience at Lake Forest College was phenomenal due to having faculty and staff supporting me throughout my undergraduate career. I was part of the Lake Forest Chicago Scholar program, which allowed me to focus on my studies and provided me with the support I needed throughout my four years. Currently, at DePaul University, the faculty is very open to meeting with students, which I have taken advantage of meeting with each of my professors. They also do an amazing job in promoting events and services. I have grown fondly of their Writing Center.

4. What excites you about equity work at your institution?
What excites me about the equity work at my institution is providing support to our student's needs and learning what we can change to assist them better. What also excites me is creating new ways to make education accessible for everyone.


5. In your role, how do you impact equitable outcomes for your students?

I have presented topics about Financial Aid and Financial Literacy in both Spanish and English in my role. I have also provided resources and guides on accessing Financial Aid, whether students are applying for the Alternative Application or FAFSA application. In addition, we are looking into having more events in multiple languages for our parents and students. Listening to the needs of students is my main priority when it comes to assisting students.

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Equity in Practice Spotlight: “Complete to Compete Strategy” at Elgin Community College

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Briefly describe a strategy in your Equity Plan that you have implemented. Include a brief description of how this strategy was chosen.
Elgin Community College (ECC) wanted to help "near completer" students for whom predicative analytics showed were in danger of not completing their degrees, despite significant progress. The top reason students were dropping out after earning significant credit hours was due to financial obligations. The Complete to Compete scholarship was created to provide financial support to students above and beyond any funds that they already receive through federal, state, and/or institutional financial aid in order to encourage students to enroll in more credit hours than they otherwise would have been able to without the additional funding and to set a goal of completing their degree by the end of the current academic year. This strategy was chosen because it was poised to implement quickly, was directly related to completion, and tied to financial need.


Articulate the intended outcomes, leading indicators and KPIs.
The intended outcome was for "near completer" students to persist or reenroll and complete their degree/transfer within one year. Enrollment, credit accumulation, academic performance, and completion rates were tracked. We wanted to show demonstrable improvements attributable to this intervention so a comparison group of like students, who did not receive the scholarship, was also tracked.

Over the course of the 2020-2021 academic year, the students receiving the Complete to Compete scholarship enrolled in approximately the same number of total credit hours, on average, as the comparison group (16.7 hours versus 16.1, respectively), but had a higher completion ratio (90% versus 79%, respectively) and, thus, a greater number of earned credit hours (15.0 versus 12.6, respectively), and, ultimately, a much greater proportion of students graduating with their Associate's degree by the end of the year (73% of scholarship students, compared to 47% of comparison group, but the initial metric was to complete within the 2020-2021 academic year).


3How has your institution applied an equity focus/lens to this strategy? What stakeholders were engaged? What data is informing your strategy?

The key stakeholders were ECC's Institutional Advancement and Student Services offices; the College's active Foundation Board; the Institutional Advancement executive director; and Institutional Research managing director.

As part of the process of generating the applicant pool for eligible students, the ECC Institutional Research office generated a statistical predictive model based on each student's demographic profile, past academic performance and socio-economic status. This model created a "predicted likelihood of graduating within 1 year" score for each student in the applicant pool. This score was then used as one component of the applicant scoring process to determine awardees. For this particular scoring category, students with lower predicted likelihood of graduating scores are given greater preference in the scholarship application scoring. The reasoning behind this is that preference for the award, in alignment with the wishes of the ECC Foundation Board, would go to students who would theoretically be helped the most by the additional funding.


For more information on this strategy at Elgin Community College, contact:
David Davin, Executive Director of Institutional Advancement & ECC Foundation, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
David Rudden, Managing Director of Institutional Research, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deborah Orth, Project Assessment Administrator, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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